Module und Lehrveranstaltungen

The DSE Master program at TU Dresden requires students to complete modules, as opposed to only completing particular exercises. One module can require one or more subjects, i.e., one or more exams, and performance in them will be combined to an overall module grade. We distinguish mandatory (Mx) and elective (Ex) modules, which are listed below.
In order to complete a module, the student must file an official application with the SCIS to be eligible for module examination. More information and the required forms can be found here: SCIS -- module examinations

Students who enrolled between 2010 and 2013 please note:

Distributed Systems Egineering ECTS
Mandatory Modules (1st Semester)

[DSE-M1-2014: Systems Engineering]
[DSE-M2-2014: Ubiquitous Systems]
[DSE-M3-2014: Transactional & Secure Platforms]
[DSE-M4-2014: System Design]

30
Elective Modules (2nd and 3rd Semester)

[DSE-E1-2014: Advanced Security and Cryptography]
[DSE-E2-2014: Wireless Sensor Networks]
[DSE-E3-2014: Distributed Operating Systems]
[DSE-E4-2014: Component-based Software Engineering]
[DSE-E5-2014: Selected Areas of Internet-based Systems]
[DSE-E6-2014: Concurrent and Distributed Systems]
[DSE-E7-2014: Software Fault Tolerance]
[DSE-E8-2014: Microkernel-based Operating Systems]
[DSE-E9-2014: Real-Time Systems]
[DSE-E10-2014: Application Development for Mobile & Ubiquitous Computing]
[DSE-E11-2014: Principles of Dependable Systems]
[DSE-E12-2014: Foundations to Computational Logic]
[DSE-E13-2014: Advanced Topics in Systems Architecture]
[DSE-E14-2014: Advanced Topics in Distributed Systems]

48
Internship/Programming Project (2nd and 3rd Semester)

[DSE-Int: Internship]

12
Master Thesis (4th Semester) 30

Mandatory Modules

DSE-M1-2014: Systems Engineering

This module introduces the basics of design, development, and operation of computational systems. The module will provide an overview of the structure of such systems, which usually consist of different hardware layers and software components. Special focus will be put on non-functional aspects of systems, such as reliability and availability, as well as on methods for providing these non-functional aspects. Studying existing systems will broaden this knowledge.

Lectures in this module include Systems Engineering I and II. Contents of the Systems Engineering lectures address issues related to the design, implementation and operation of systems. The main challenges in the systems engineering domain are how to address complexity and guarantee quality. Quality measures that we address in this course are scalability, performance, safety, security, robustness, manageability and availability.

Links:
Systems Engineering I - Lecture Information
Systems Engineering II - Lecture Information

DSE-M2-2014: Ubiquitous Systems

This module will provide an overview of middleware architecture and platforms for the development of distributed applications and information systems. In doing so, the focus will be both on the intensive discussion of the field of mobile communication or mobile processing. The students will learn to identify and develop concepts and architectures for distributed and omnipresent applications, to choose appropriate solutions, and to evaluate modern technological developments in this field.

Lectures include:

  • Distributed Systems: an introduction to problems, concepts and solutions of Distributed Systems. It covers basic principles such as the client/server model, remote procedure call, distributed object-oriented systems as well as current standards.
  • Mobile Communication/Computing: an introduction to principles, standards and solutions for mobile communication and its applications within the area of mobile computing. Based on the physical foundations of mobile communication channels, typical standards such as GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication) are presented. Techniques for locating mobile users and mobile devices also present a major focus area. In the area of application support, typical software architectures and services for mobile computing are discussed. Examples of application areas covered are sales support and service engineering. An outlook towards high performance communication in mobile networks and related applications concludes the lecture.

Links:
Distributed Systems - Lecture Information
Mobile Communication and Mobile Computing - Lecture Information

DSE-M3-2014: Transactional & Secure Platforms

Students who complete this module are able to discuss further topics on the transactional processing in distributed environments (especially with regard to large information systems) and of the construction of distributed and secure systems from the angle of date security and apply their knowledge in practical scenarios. They have a basic understanding of information systems and data security in distributed systems and have learned how to solve questions in this area on their own.

  • Transactional Information Systems: Database systems play a central role in building large and distributed transactionally working information systems. Within this lecture, we discuss techniques that are required to set up a robust distributed information system. After repeating the core concepts of ER modeling and the relational database model, including SQL and object-relational extensions added within SQL:2003, we focus on different data models like network data model, object-oriented data model, and XML data model in combination with different database manipulation languages. Thereafter, we discuss concepts required in the area of distributed data management like 2-phase commit and core concepts of replication technology.
  • Security and Cryptography I: This lecture introduces the basic concepts of security and cryptography.

Links:
Transactional Information Systems - Lecture Information
Security & Cryptography I - Lecture Information

DSE-M4-2014: System Design

After having completed the module, students have learned how to apply basic methods, constructional elements and notations for the systematic development of large software systems and also the methodology of modelling and simulating discrete event systems. The framework of the module is based on the software development process with its life cycle models and phase models and additionally on the application of simulation and modelling techniques to the design of large and flexible application systems. Students who have completed the module are able to assist the development of large, consolidated, state-of-the-art software systems and to apply the methods of systems analysis to practical scenarios.

Link:
Design Patterns and Frameworks - Lecture Information

DSE-Int: Internship

After having completed the module, students will be able to independently accomplish individual research projects that focus on the practical application of the skills acquired during studies to distributed systems. They will have learned to analyse complex tasks and work out efficient solutions. This will enable them to understand and discuss practical scenarios in their professional lives and find feasible solutions.

Students can choose among any lab (Komplexpraktikum) that is offered at the faculty of computer science. Two labs are required to pass the module, or one study thesis.

Links:
Lab: Software Fault Tolerance
Lab: Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Lab: Systems Engineering
Internships at the Computer Networks professorship

Elective Modules

DSE-E1-2014: Advanced Security and Cryptography

This module gives a thorough introduction to security in general and to multilateral security of IT-systems in particular. Protection goals and their interdependencies are discussed as well as reasonable attacker models. Different kinds of security mechanisms are introduced to provide examples and to clarify that security mechanisms are means to provide for protection goals against attackers at most as powerful as described in the attacker model. Cryptosystems are the fundamental security mechanisms to achieve the protection goals confidentiality and integrity in distributed IT-systems and are therefore discussed indepth: This module provides a classification of cryptosystems according to the protection goal they are aiming at and the key-distribution they use and it focuses on those cryptosystems whose security is as much validated as possible or even provable.

Students will be enabled both to define and analyze security properties of IT-systems in two respects: What security properties the IT-system is supposed to have and how sure we can be that it really has these properties with respect to could be attackers. In addition, basic knowledge is acquired and basic skills are developed how to construct secure IT-systems.

Link:
Security and Cryptography II - Lecture Information

DSE-E2-2014: Wireless Sensor Networks

The course is especially for those students who are interested in ubiquitous computing and particularly in Wireless Sensor Networks. The course begins with an introduction to the application of wireless sensor networks and the main components which constitute wireless sensor networks. After wards, it investigates typical aspects of wireless sensor networks such as energy consumption, communications, in-network processing, and self-organisation. These aspects determine the type of architecture a given wireless sensor network should have. Following this, the course delves into the issues of link formation and medium access control in wireless sensor networks where a set of proposed algorithms will be investigated. Because a wireless sensor network is a distributed network, time synchronisation, topology control and data aggregation issues will also be treated in this course. Another aspect of the course is routing techniques and query distribution. These two issues will be treated in particular detail since they influence the life time of a wireless sensor network. The course will then investigate outstanding issues in wireless sensor networks.

Link:
Wireless Sensor Networks - Lecture Information

DSE-E3-2014: Distributed Operating Systems

Upon completion of the module, students have learned to solve complex problems of the design of distributed systems on their own, to analyse case studies and to make comparisons with other projects to identify potential critical issues. They can make argumentative points and defend them.
Moreover students are familiar with scalability, fault tolerance, security and robustness and can see things in context with issues, such as database development and computer architecture. Thanks to their broad knowledge, students can also assess the latest developments and discuss them.

Link:
Distributed Operating Systems - Lecture Information

DSE-E4-2014: Component-based Software Engineering

Upon the successful completion of this module, students are able to face the challenges of modern complex software systems using a component-based development concept. They know how to build applications step by step using independent components and how to increase their flexibility. Thanks to very practical exercises, they are also capable of solving realistic tasks and to tackle new challenges on the basis of the sound fundamental skills they acquired.

Link:
Component-based Software Engineering - Lecture Information

DSE-E5-2014: Selected Areas of Internet-based Systems

Upon completion of the module, students have learned to understand and discuss general Internet technologies and protocols and also the technical basics and methodological principles. This includes traditional applications and protocols, such as HTTP, DNS or IPv4 and also more recent developments, e.g. IPv6, IPSec, mobile IP or VoIP. Starting from these fundamental skills, students can go further into the field and work on problems on their own.
Moreover, students understand innovative web applications and web technologies and can apply and extend them on their own. This applies not only to basic principles but also actual standards, systems and techniques, such as Web 2.0, Ajax, OWL, podcasts, blogs, Wikis, BitTorrent etc.
Note that students must select 2 out of 3 lectures in this module. WARNING: watch out for conflicts with DSE-E2 and DSE-E10!

Links:
Internet and Web Applications - Lecture Information
Wireless Sensor Networks - Lecture Information
Application Development for Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing - Lecture Information

DSE-E6-2014: Concurrent and Distributed Systems

Upon completion of this module, students have a good understanding of the fundamentals of concurrent and distributed systems, which are necessary for the construction and operation of concurrent and distributed applications. They can work with transactional memory systems, which will be supported by most CPUs in the future. This enables them to develop concurrent and distributed systems and to analyse their functionality on their own.

Links:
Foundations of Concurrent and Distributed Systems - Lecture Information
Concurrent and Distributed Systems Lab - Information

DSE-E7-2014: Software Fault Tolerance

The root cause of many system outages are software bugs. This is particularly the case for distributed systems because distributed software is inherently more complex than traditional software for single processor systems. The complexity and economics of software and system development implies that software bugs will not be eliminated. Hence, designs and mechanisms that can deal with software bugs during runtime are needed. This module consists of a course that introduces a wide variety of software fault tolerance concepts and mechanisms, a seminar in which very recent papers in the field of software fault tolerance are presented, and a computer lab that provides an in-depth, hands-on experience in selected software fault tolerance mechanisms.

Link:
Software Fault Tolerance - Lecture Information
Software Fault Tolerance Lab - Information
Current Topics in Software Fault Tolerance (Seminar) - Information


DSE-E8-2014: Microkernel-based Operating Systems

Microkernels are small operating-system kernels on which operating systems can be built flexibly. They are often used in real-time, security-sensitive, or embedded applications to provide a small system core for critical tasks, but can also be used to build well-structured general-purpose operating systems. This module teaches the construction of both microkernels and systems built on top of microkernels.

This module provides low-level insight in (not only microkernel-based) operatingsystems construction. We use a hands-on approach to systems teaching and use thesource code of real, working microkernels and operating systems. Topics in microkernel construction include CPU data structures, kernel entry and exit, system calls, virtualmemory management, inter-process communication, scheduling, threads, portability, and virtualization. Topics in operating-systems construction include system boot-up, high-level memory management, synchronization, interface description languages, device drivers, Linux on microkernels, multi-server operating systems, and real-time and secure operating systems.

Link:
Microkernel-based Operating Systems- Lecture Information

DSE-E9-2014: Real-Time Systems

The main objective of this module is to teach the fundamentals of real-time systems, i.e., systems whose correct functioning depends on the observation of timeliness agreements. The outline of this module is based on the observation that the construction of real-time systems requires comprehensive thinking about many different sub-fields of Computer Science. This module first introduces fundamental real-time concepts (modeling of load and resources, time, clocks and clock synchronization, time-controlled vs. event-controlled designs, scheduling procedures). Building on that, topics related to real-time systems from several sub-fields of Computer Science will be discussed. Among these are real-time programming languages, synchronous and event-controlled systems, real-time operating systems, real-time systems and hardware, micro-controller, caches, real-time communication in field buses and wide area networks and application of realtime systems.

Link:
Real-Time Systems - Lecture Information

DSE-E10-2014: Application Development for Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing

The course is especially for students which are interested in mobile computing applications and their implementation. The course starts with an introduction also to new areas like Ambient Intelligence and Ubiqitous Computing, describes applications and gives an overview about the domain.

After that, the next courses consider different functionalities such as networking aspects (different short and long range communication capabilities), and special mobile computing concepts such as disconnected and autonomous operation, mobile agents and context based adaptation. After that, different architectures for mobile distributed systems are discussed. Different options for implementing mobile systems, starting from communication, over local and distributed platforms (e.g. OSGi, J2ME, J2EE) until the implementation of graphical user interfaces are given in the implementation section of the course. Additional concepts such as mobile security, data synchronozation, downsizing of applications to mobile devices, data synchronization methods, databases for mobile devices, location based services, Semantic Web and autonomous behaviour will be partly discussed in a separate section. Tools, environments, platforms and emulators are considered near the end of the course, as well as current international research and industrial projects will be presented.

Link:
Application Development for Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing - Lecture Information

DSE-E11-2014: Principles of Dependable Systems

Many systems are either mission or safety critical. This module introduces the underlying principle of how to design and implement dependable systems. The main emphasis is on distributed protocol design for critical systems in the face of a variety of failure types. The module consists of a course, exercise sessions and a seminar. The exercises emphasize the application of the principles introduced in the course to the practical design of high availability systems. The seminar will present very recent papers from the field of dependable systems.

Links:
Principles of Dependable Systems - Lecture Information
Current Topics in Dependable Systems (Seminar) - Information

DSE-E12-2014: Foundations of Computational Logic

The module offers a comprehensive introduction to Computational Logic covering the main subareas as well as main methods and techniques. After recalling basic notions from propositional and first order logic, complexity theory and computer algebra, the areas of equational reasoning, deduction, proof theory, abduction and induction, nonmonotonic reasoning, logic based program development, natural language processing and machine learning as well as logic and connectionism are covered. This module consists of lectures and tutorials. The total of 9 credit points can be scored by passing the final written examination of the module. The module takes one semester and is offered every winter semester.

Link:
Foundations of Computational Logic - Module Description

DSE-E13-2014: Advanced Topics in Systems Architecture

This module allows students to broaden their knowledge with a fine selection of lectures from the faculty of computer science. These lectures are not part of other modules and they will be announced before the semester.
Additionally, students may include those DSE lectures that are not yet comprised in any other modules. Please note that any given lecture may only be counted for DSE once, i.e., it cannot be included in more than one module.
Furthermore, students may include other academic records, e.g., lectures taken at other faculty institutes, other faculties, or even other universities. If a student wants such external records to be acknowledged, s/he must file an official application with the SCIS. Following this procedure, the examination board will check the application and make a decision on a by-case basis. The necessary application forms can be found here: SCIS forms

Please note that, in order to include external aademic records, you must also provide all respective certificates to prove your claim of participation and grade. Without prove of correctness, the SCIS will disregard your application.

For details regarding explicitly offered lectures for DSE-E13-2014, please see the official lecture plan: official lecture plan

DSE-E14-2014: Advanced Topics in Distributed Systems

This module allows students to broaden their knowledge with a fine selection of lectures from the faculty of computer science. These lectures are not part of other modules and they will be announced before the semester.
Additionally, students may include those DSE lectures that are not yet comprised in any other modules. Please note that any given lecture may only be counted for DSE once, i.e., it cannot be included in more than one module.
Furthermore, students may include other academic records, e.g., lectures taken at other faculty institutes, other faculties, or even other universities. If a student wants such external records to be acknowledged, s/he must file an official application with the SCIS. Following this procedure, the examination board will check the application and make a decision on a by-case basis. The necessary application forms can be found here: SCIS forms

Please note that, in order to include external aademic records, you must also provide all respective certificates to prove your claim of participation and grade. Without prove of correctness, the SCIS will disregard your application.

For details regarding explicitly offered lectures for DSE-E14-2014, please see the official lecture plan: official lecture plan

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Letzte Änderung: 05.10.2016