the thinker © NA

Summer School on Cognitive Reasoning

Reasoning is associated with thinking, cognition, and intellect. It may be subdivided into forms of classical logical reasoning: deductive reasoning, inductive reasoning, abductive reasoning; non-classical logical reasoning: analogical reasoning, commonsense reasoning, defeasible reasoning, probabilistic reasoning; and other modes of reasoning such as counterfactual reasoning, intuitive reasoning, and verbal reasoning. Reasoning is based on knowledge and beliefs, but knowledge may be incomplete and beliefs may be incorrect; inconsistencies may arise. Knowledge must be acquired or learned, beliefs must be revised and updated, and preferences, likes and dislikes must be taken into account.

Cognition is the mental action or process of acquiring knowledge and understanding through thought, experience, and the senses. Cognition refers to functions of the (human) brain and other biological processes. However, cognitive theories need not necessarily involve the brain or the biological processes, but may describe their behavior in terms of information flow or function. Hence, cognitive reasoning refers to modeling the human ability to draw meaningful conclusions despite incomplete and inconsistent knowledge. The modeling involves the representation of knowledge, the acquisition and update of the knowledge, as well as all computational processes of deriving conclusions given the knowledge. All processes from the acquisition and update of knowledge to the derivation of conclusions must be implementable and executable on appropriate hardware.

The 2022 summer school on cognitive reasoning will introduce its participants to the basic and applied ongoing research in the area of cognitive reasoning at the TU Dresden and beyond.

learn more Summer School on Cognitive Reasoning